[who are the sponsors? Managing indoctrination risks…] CALL TO PARTICIPATE AT THE 4TH EDITION OF KENYA SCHOOL OF INTERNET GOVERNANCE (KESIG)

In case you missed the link. Here it is.
www.kictanet.or.ke/?page_id=40115
You will find all the previous KeSIG reports.

A brief background: Schools of internet governance (SIGs) are an offshoot
of Internet Governance Fora (IGF). Internet governance fora are national
and regional events that feed into the global UN hosted IGF. IGF is an
annual soft law making event. It is multi stakeholder in its organisation
and discussions.

The Kenya School of Internet Governance (KeSIG) is being held prior to the
Kenya IGF. KeSIG runs from 29th -31st July while KIGF will be on 1st
August. Like the global events, KeSIG and KIGF are also multistakeholder,
bringing together the local community. While the event is sponsored by
multiple stakeholders, it is convened by KICTANet.Infact, I am sure you
will feature in the programme, should you have the time as you always bring
a fresh view to our debates here. Please also see previous emails calling
for volunteers to the KeSIG steering
<lists.kictanet.or.ke/pipermail/kictanet/2019-June/034691.html>committee
and KIGF
<lists.kictanet.or.ke/pipermail/kictanet/2019-June/034680.html>.
There is also a call for KIGF topics
<lists.kictanet.or.ke/pipermail/kictanet/2019-July/034717.html>.

Finally, we are very proud of Mwara, our Tech Policy Associate, whose
journey begun from being a fellow at KeSIG. She is now the administrative
lead in the 4th edition of the school. So KeSIG is also a training ground
for youth.

Warm regards,

On Wed, 3 Jul 2019 at 19:20, Patrick A. M. Maina via kictanet <
kictanet@lists.kictanet.or.ke> wrote:

> Dear listers,
>
> When it comes to topics that can influence thought on policy issues, the
> line between training and indoctrination or brainwash becomes very thin –
> hence the need for vigilance, close scrutiny, transparency and *neutrality
> assurance* of (all) policy-related training initiatives.
>
> Some of the companies known to sponsor such events worldwide are notorious
> for aggressive lobbying on policy or governance issues, ostensibly:
>
> a. to try avoid impending regulation of their harmful/anti-social business
> models (or to distort accountability and responsibility narratives);
>
> b to try gain unfair advantage over government policy (and/or procurement)
> by corrupting rules, infiltrating and subverting public sector initiatives,
> or by peddling influence;
>
> c. to institutionalize, launder and/or officially entrench their
> socially/economically damaging profit models.
>
> A number of them have been accused by multiple governments, regulators,
> civil society, journalists, intellectuals, internet users (via class action
> lawsuits) and even their own former executives of using either unlawful or
> dishonest / grossly unethical business practices in ruthless pursuit of
> profit. Examples of these dubious practices include purposefully developing
> harmful/addiction-forming radicalizing online products targeted at young
> people, using deceptive tactics to grow or protect their businesses,
> infiltrating and subverting public education systems, subverting economies
> by capturing workers and learners attention, brazen disregard for people’s
> privacy, unethical exploitation of private info, brazenly breaking laws or
> aggressively exploiting weak laws, exploiting public ignorance for profit
> and using predatory commercial strategies that are harmful to the public.
>
> The same companies, despite having BILLIONS in revenue, *agressively
> avoid* contributing their FAIR SHARE of taxes (sometimes to the extent of
> operating illegally, with impunity, in poor countries) – thus unfairly
> increasing the burden on governments and taxpayers to fund remediation for
> the indirect damage that these rogue companies cause e.g. damage to public
> health, subverting education, political instability, extremism and economic
> sabotage. These indirect, hidden burdens (negative externalities) can be
> socio-economically devastating – especially in developing economies, but
> are seldom recognized, highlighted, mitigated or attributed to the
> companies that are creating/amplifying them. The same companies then
> chicanerously manipulate the civil society (e.g. via training &
> sponsorship) to defend their commercial products as a “human right”!
>
> So depending on the sponsor(s), curriculum and governance framework, a
> training initiative could either be seen as legitimate training or a kind
> of backdoor indoctrination.
>
> This is why it is important to have full transparency and independent
> vetting of such sensitive initiatives (including sponsors, curriculum,
> tutors, accreditation etc).
>
> Also the use of the word “school” suggests an institution that has
> undergone formal vetting and accreditation. Yet when I look at the website,
> it ostensibly reads as if the “school” is an event. Questions:
>
> 1. Is it a school or is it an event?
>
> 2. Where is the school based?
>
> 3. Is it registered with relevant training oversight bodies?
>
> 4. Who are the lecturers and what are their credentials?
>
> 5. Who developed the coursework & what process was used? This is in view
> of high risk of content subversion due to powerful business interests
> having high conflicts of interest on policy and governance issues.
>
> 6. Is the school & coursework accredited? By which bodies?
>
> 7. Does it issue certificates?
>
> 8. How is the school/course funded? Does it have transparency reports?
> Where can they be found?
>
> 9. Who are the sponsors of this event/course?
>
> 10. How is conflict of interest avoided (currently and in the past)? Who
> audits & certifies neutrality?
>
> 11. By now such kinds of (potentially subjective) public-interest courses
> should have been put somewhere online for free and open access. This also
> allows for independent public scrutiny of the course content. How come this
> more transparent (and more pro-internet) approach has not yet been taken
> (despite big sponsors)?
>
> This is not to cast aspersions on this specific initiative but to point
> out, in good faith and in public interest, possible areas of risks or
> concern, so that they can be addressed or clarified. The issues above
> generally apply to any initiative(s) purporting to train stakeholders on
> policy and governance.
>
> Perhaps KICTANet officials can shed more light on the above issues please
> or point us to online resources that have the answers for each question
> above?
>
> Many thanks & have a blessed day.
>
> Patrick.
>
> Patrick A. M. Maina
> [Cross-domain Innovator | Independent Public Policy Analyst – Indigenous
> Innovations]
>
> On Wednesday, July 3, 2019, 12:24:28 PM GMT+3, mwara gichanga via kictanet
> <kictanet@lists.kictanet.or.ke> wrote:
>
>
> Dear Listers
>
> The internet has become a vital platform for social, economic and
> political development in the world, and more increasing so here in Kenya.
> These bring about a lot of national interests around internet governance
> debates across all sectors .
>
> The Kenya ICT Action Network (KICTANet) is pleased to welcome applications
> from those individuals interested in internet Governance for the 4th
> Edition of the Kenya School of Internet Governance (KeSIG). KeSIG takes
> place prior to the Kenya IGF, with the aim of introducing beginners to
> basic concepts in internet policy making. This is with the goal of creating
> and increasing the available expertise for participation in local and
> global internet governance processes.
>
> Learn more about KeSIG HERE <www.kictanet.or.ke/?page_id=40115>
>
> Whether you are a policy maker, a researcher, a regulator, an engineer, a
> journalist, an entrepreneur or a human rights defender – if you are
> interested and want to get involved in internet policy and governance ,
> KeSIG is designed perfectly for you!
>
> KeSIG will take place over a 3-day course from the 29th-31st July 2019,
> with the deadline for submissions closing on 13th July 2019, and
> announcement of selected participants following soon after.
>
> Kindly access application form HERE <forms.gle/vCncJuuGSnowFUhNA>
>
> 4TH EDITION OF KENYA SCHOOL OF INTERNET GOVERNANCE(KESIG)
>
> KICTANet welcomes applications for fellows for the 4th Edition of the
> Kenya School of Internet Governance (KeSIG…
> <forms.gle/vCncJuuGSnowFUhNA>
>
>
> For any further information or clarification , kindly email
> info@kictanet.or.ke or Mwara Gichanga mwaragichanga@kictanet.or.ke
>
> Warmly
>
> Mwara Gichanga
>
> Tech Policy Associate
>
> KICTANet
>
>
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> The Kenya ICT Action Network (KICTANet) is a multi-stakeholder platform
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>
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>
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>
> The Kenya ICT Action Network (KICTANet) is a multi-stakeholder platform
> for people and institutions interested and involved in ICT policy and
> regulation. The network aims to act as a catalyst for reform in the ICT
> sector in support of the national aim of ICT enabled growth and development.
>
> KICTANetiquette : Adhere to the same standards of acceptable behaviors
> online that you follow in real life: respect people’s times and bandwidth,
> share knowledge, don’t flame or abuse or personalize, respect privacy, do
> not spam, do not market your wares or qualifications.
>

KICTANet Admin information

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