[who are the sponsors? Managing indoctrination risks…] CALL TO PARTICIPATE AT THE 4TH EDITION OF KENYA SCHOOL OF INTERNET GOVERNANCE (KESIG)

Patrick

Get a life.

*Ali Hussein*

*Principal*

*AHK & Associates*

Tel: +254 713 601113

Twitter: @AliHKassim

Skype: abu-jomo

LinkedIn: ke.linkedin.com/in/alihkassim
<ke.linkedin.com/in/alihkassim>

13th Floor , Delta Towers, Oracle Wing,

Chiromo Road, Westlands,

Nairobi, Kenya.

Any information of a personal nature expressed in this email are purely
mine and do not necessarily reflect the official positions of the
organizations that I work with.

On Wed, Jul 3, 2019 at 7:20 PM Patrick A. M. Maina via kictanet <
kictanet@lists.kictanet.or.ke> wrote:

> Dear listers,
>
> When it comes to topics that can influence thought on policy issues, the
> line between training and indoctrination or brainwash becomes very thin –
> hence the need for vigilance, close scrutiny, transparency and *neutrality
> assurance* of (all) policy-related training initiatives.
>
> Some of the companies known to sponsor such events worldwide are notorious
> for aggressive lobbying on policy or governance issues, ostensibly:
>
> a. to try avoid impending regulation of their harmful/anti-social business
> models (or to distort accountability and responsibility narratives);
>
> b to try gain unfair advantage over government policy (and/or procurement)
> by corrupting rules, infiltrating and subverting public sector initiatives,
> or by peddling influence;
>
> c. to institutionalize, launder and/or officially entrench their
> socially/economically damaging profit models.
>
> A number of them have been accused by multiple governments, regulators,
> civil society, journalists, intellectuals, internet users (via class action
> lawsuits) and even their own former executives of using either unlawful or
> dishonest / grossly unethical business practices in ruthless pursuit of
> profit. Examples of these dubious practices include purposefully developing
> harmful/addiction-forming radicalizing online products targeted at young
> people, using deceptive tactics to grow or protect their businesses,
> infiltrating and subverting public education systems, subverting economies
> by capturing workers and learners attention, brazen disregard for people’s
> privacy, unethical exploitation of private info, brazenly breaking laws or
> aggressively exploiting weak laws, exploiting public ignorance for profit
> and using predatory commercial strategies that are harmful to the public.
>
> The same companies, despite having BILLIONS in revenue, *agressively
> avoid* contributing their FAIR SHARE of taxes (sometimes to the extent of
> operating illegally, with impunity, in poor countries) – thus unfairly
> increasing the burden on governments and taxpayers to fund remediation for
> the indirect damage that these rogue companies cause e.g. damage to public
> health, subverting education, political instability, extremism and economic
> sabotage. These indirect, hidden burdens (negative externalities) can be
> socio-economically devastating – especially in developing economies, but
> are seldom recognized, highlighted, mitigated or attributed to the
> companies that are creating/amplifying them. The same companies then
> chicanerously manipulate the civil society (e.g. via training &
> sponsorship) to defend their commercial products as a “human right”!
>
> So depending on the sponsor(s), curriculum and governance framework, a
> training initiative could either be seen as legitimate training or a kind
> of backdoor indoctrination.
>
> This is why it is important to have full transparency and independent
> vetting of such sensitive initiatives (including sponsors, curriculum,
> tutors, accreditation etc).
>
> Also the use of the word “school” suggests an institution that has
> undergone formal vetting and accreditation. Yet when I look at the website,
> it ostensibly reads as if the “school” is an event. Questions:
>
> 1. Is it a school or is it an event?
>
> 2. Where is the school based?
>
> 3. Is it registered with relevant training oversight bodies?
>
> 4. Who are the lecturers and what are their credentials?
>
> 5. Who developed the coursework & what process was used? This is in view
> of high risk of content subversion due to powerful business interests
> having high conflicts of interest on policy and governance issues.
>
> 6. Is the school & coursework accredited? By which bodies?
>
> 7. Does it issue certificates?
>
> 8. How is the school/course funded? Does it have transparency reports?
> Where can they be found?
>
> 9. Who are the sponsors of this event/course?
>
> 10. How is conflict of interest avoided (currently and in the past)? Who
> audits & certifies neutrality?
>
> 11. By now such kinds of (potentially subjective) public-interest courses
> should have been put somewhere online for free and open access. This also
> allows for independent public scrutiny of the course content. How come this
> more transparent (and more pro-internet) approach has not yet been taken
> (despite big sponsors)?
>
> This is not to cast aspersions on this specific initiative but to point
> out, in good faith and in public interest, possible areas of risks or
> concern, so that they can be addressed or clarified. The issues above
> generally apply to any initiative(s) purporting to train stakeholders on
> policy and governance.
>
> Perhaps KICTANet officials can shed more light on the above issues please
> or point us to online resources that have the answers for each question
> above?
>
> Many thanks & have a blessed day.
>
> Patrick.
>
> Patrick A. M. Maina
> [Cross-domain Innovator | Independent Public Policy Analyst – Indigenous
> Innovations]
>
> On Wednesday, July 3, 2019, 12:24:28 PM GMT+3, mwara gichanga via kictanet
> <kictanet@lists.kictanet.or.ke> wrote:
>
>
> Dear Listers
>
> The internet has become a vital platform for social, economic and
> political development in the world, and more increasing so here in Kenya.
> These bring about a lot of national interests around internet governance
> debates across all sectors .
>
> The Kenya ICT Action Network (KICTANet) is pleased to welcome applications
> from those individuals interested in internet Governance for the 4th
> Edition of the Kenya School of Internet Governance (KeSIG). KeSIG takes
> place prior to the Kenya IGF, with the aim of introducing beginners to
> basic concepts in internet policy making. This is with the goal of creating
> and increasing the available expertise for participation in local and
> global internet governance processes.
>
> Learn more about KeSIG HERE <www.kictanet.or.ke/?page_id=40115>
>
> Whether you are a policy maker, a researcher, a regulator, an engineer, a
> journalist, an entrepreneur or a human rights defender – if you are
> interested and want to get involved in internet policy and governance ,
> KeSIG is designed perfectly for you!
>
> KeSIG will take place over a 3-day course from the 29th-31st July 2019,
> with the deadline for submissions closing on 13th July 2019, and
> announcement of selected participants following soon after.
>
> Kindly access application form HERE <forms.gle/vCncJuuGSnowFUhNA>
>
> 4TH EDITION OF KENYA SCHOOL OF INTERNET GOVERNANCE(KESIG)
>
> KICTANet welcomes applications for fellows for the 4th Edition of the
> Kenya School of Internet Governance (KeSIG…
> <forms.gle/vCncJuuGSnowFUhNA>
>
>
> For any further information or clarification , kindly email
> info@kictanet.or.ke or Mwara Gichanga mwaragichanga@kictanet.or.ke
>
> Warmly
>
> Mwara Gichanga
>
> Tech Policy Associate
>
> KICTANet
>
>
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>
> The Kenya ICT Action Network (KICTANet) is a multi-stakeholder platform
> for people and institutions interested and involved in ICT policy and
> regulation. The network aims to act as a catalyst for reform in the ICT
> sector in support of the national aim of ICT enabled growth and development.
>
> KICTANetiquette : Adhere to the same standards of acceptable behaviors
> online that you follow in real life: respect people’s times and bandwidth,
> share knowledge, don’t flame or abuse or personalize, respect privacy, do
> not spam, do not market your wares or qualifications.
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>
> Unsubscribe or change your options at
> lists.kictanet.or.ke/mailman/options/kictanet/info%40alyhussein.com
>
> The Kenya ICT Action Network (KICTANet) is a multi-stakeholder platform
> for people and institutions interested and involved in ICT policy and
> regulation. The network aims to act as a catalyst for reform in the ICT
> sector in support of the national aim of ICT enabled growth and development.
>
> KICTANetiquette : Adhere to the same standards of acceptable behaviors
> online that you follow in real life: respect people’s times and bandwidth,
> share knowledge, don’t flame or abuse or personalize, respect privacy, do
> not spam, do not market your wares or qualifications.
>

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