Enhancing National Cybersecurity Posture through Cyber Hygiene Trainings for Vulnerable and Excluded Communities

KICTANet in collaboration with the Association of Women in ICT (ACWICT) conducted a two-day cyber hygiene training for farmers and community level trainers based in Nanyuki between 7th and 8th June 2022. The training was part of the one week capacity building  programme for key stakeholder groups based in Laikipia county. 60 participants were trained on cyber hygiene and digital safety, including on methods to secure access to their connections and devices, password management and identifying scammers. Earlier in the week, KICTANet had trained 48 farmers from Nyahururu, making up a total of 108 trained so far during the ongoing cyber hygiene awareness campaign.

The training in Nyahururu was a training of trainers session that included farmers and community level trainers who lead various initiatives in their communities such as: coordinating access to digital markets, enhancing digital literacy and leading smart farming programs. The participants  are expected to impart the knowledge acquired to other  farmers in their respective communities.

 

Increased Digital Threats.

Isaac Sarioyo, a livestock farmer who manages a pastoralist community in Kajiado sharing communal land, notes that there has been an increase in digital threats targeting farmers on online platforms. Isaac and his community use the Laikipia Wakulima Market, a Facebook page that connects farmers with buyers on a variety of farm products. As he uses the page to sell mutton, he observes that  fellow farmers are exposed to dangers including scamming and physical harm. Such incidents result from  con artists who masquerade as buyers who then lure farmers into sending funds or sending their produce to particular locations and thereafter, defraud them. This has led to genuine vendors and buyers alike losing trust in transacting on the online platforms. To tackle this challenge, the group admins have set up a verification mechanism to distinguish genuine buyers and sellers from the fake ones. But the challenge still exists. He also identifies sim swap fraud as a common crime that has led to many of his pastoralist community members losing money. 

 

 

The cyber hygiene course curriculum.

The cyber hygiene course includes  modules that explain   concepts such as physical and digital currencies, secure access to devices and device hygiene. The modules empower farmers and the community level trainers on ways and tools to keep their digital money safe and on how to detect and deter cybercriminals. The digital money module also covers how to determine and choose different methods of secure access to online financial platforms and mobile money accounts. In addition, the farmers were able to enhance their digital security through learning about tools such as biometrics authentication, One Time Password (OTP) and secure PIN access and how to choose those that are  most suitable with their lifestyles and contexts.

Some of the farmers, Isaac notes, are elderly or disabled and therefore need assistance to use digital technologies. In addition, the participants were taught how to impart the knowledge gained to their colleagues and  the elderly, people living with disabilities and their caregivers.

This training is supported by  the United Kingdom’s Digital Access Programme and implemented in partnership with the ICT Authority, Kenya Film Classifications Board, Communications Authority of Kenya, the Ministry of ICT and Youth Affairs, ACWICT. The program seeks to promote  cyber hygiene practices among digitally excluded and marginalised populations in Kenya.

 

 

 

 KICTANet in collaboration with the Association of Women in ICT (ACWICT) conducted a two-day cyber hygiene training for farmers and community level trainers based in Nanyuki between 7th and 8th June 2022. The training was part of the one week capacity building  programme for key stakeholder groups based in Laikipia county. 60 participants were trained on cyber hygiene and digital safety, including on methods to secure access to their connections and devices, password management and identifying scammers. Earlier in the week, KICTANet had trained 48 farmers from Nyahururu, making up a total of 108 trained so far during the ongoing cyber hygiene awareness campaign.

The training in Nyahururu was a training of trainers session that included farmers and community level trainers who lead various initiatives in their communities such as: coordinating access to digital markets, enhancing digital literacy and leading smart farming programs. The participants  are expected to impart the knowledge acquired to other  farmers in their respective communities.

 

Increased Digital Threats.

Isaac Sarioyo, a livestock farmer who manages a pastoralist community in Kajiado sharing communal land, notes that there has been an increase in digital threats targeting farmers on online platforms. Isaac and his community use the Laikipia Wakulima Market, a Facebook page that connects farmers with buyers on a variety of farm products. As he uses the page to sell mutton, he observes that  fellow farmers are exposed to dangers including scamming and physical harm. Such incidents result from  con artists who masquerade as buyers who then lure farmers into sending funds or sending their produce to particular locations and thereafter, defraud them. This has led to genuine vendors and buyers alike losing trust in transacting on the online platforms. To tackle this challenge, the group admins have set up a verification mechanism to distinguish genuine buyers and sellers from the fake ones. But the challenge still exists. He also identifies sim swap fraud as a common crime that has led to many of his pastoralist community members losing money. 

 

The cyber hygiene course curriculum.

The cyber hygiene course includes  modules that explain   concepts such as physical and digital currencies, secure access to devices and device hygiene. The modules empower farmers and the community level trainers on ways and tools to keep their digital money safe and on how to detect and deter cybercriminals. The digital money module also covers how to determine and choose different methods of secure access to online financial platforms and mobile money accounts. In addition, the farmers were able to enhance their digital security through learning about tools such as biometrics authentication, One Time Password (OTP) and secure PIN access and how to choose those that are  most suitable with their lifestyles and contexts.

Some of the farmers, Isaac notes, are elderly or disabled and therefore need assistance to use digital technologies. In addition, the participants were taught how to impart the knowledge gained to their colleagues and  the elderly, people living with disabilities and their caregivers.

This training is supported by  the United Kingdom’s Digital Access Programme and implemented in partnership with the ICT Authority, Kenya Film Classifications Board, Communications Authority of Kenya, the Ministry of ICT and Youth Affairs, ACWICT. The program seeks to promote  cyber hygiene practices among digitally excluded and marginalised populations in Kenya.

 

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