ict practitioners bill is back

Kevin,

Let us separate this into two:
1. Products
2. Services

Reviewing products is a lot easier, as you got the final product, can try
the trial version and despite whoever has built it, you can then come up
with a conclusion of whether its fit for purpose.

Now, how do you review Services? You asked how would I tell you are an
advanced Network Engineer? I’d ask for your qualifications, certifications,
experience, referrals would also shoot you questions around what I need you
to do.

Now, what you are proposing is short-circuiting that process and
pre-qualifying people. Why would you want to repeat what the industry has
already done? Cisco, Juniper, Huawei, Nokia, Siemens have each their own
certifications of Advanced Network Engineering. Why would you want to
duplicate that? Would such an organization even have the skills to
interrogate every possible certification in the market?

And that is just Networks… Extrapolate that to Software products which
are in their thousands (Oracle, SAP, A1, MS, IBM, SAS, Redhat, HP etc) each
with its own Certifications and Requirements and you want to pre-qualify
people for that as well?

Add Software Development, more than 30 possible languages we develop in,
each with more than 30 levels of different knowledge levels / permutations
and you want to pre-qualify that as well?

Unless this is where our projected 1million jobs will come from, I really
don’t see anyone in Kenya and even globally with such resources and time to
undertake such an exercise and one that wouldn’t add any value beyond whats
currently generally available in the market.

Regards

On Mon, Dec 18, 2017 at 7:08 PM, Kevin Kamonye <kevin.kamonye@gmail.com>
wrote:

> Hello Waithaka,
>
> Perhaps let us not judge that the proposed bill by the CS to be a duck
> before we have even seen or heard from it. Also, the only reason why I am
> entertaining this bill is that unlike the previous one, is that we are
> being invited to put forward constructive proposals.
>
> Now, what are some of the professions we have in the software industry?
>> 1. Programmers / developers
>> 2. System Administrators
>> 3. Database Administrators
>> 4. Enterprise Architects
>> 5. UX Designers
>> Now, try making a common regulation for those 5 out of a possible
>> hundreds…
>
>
> ​If we are talking about a peer reviewed ​process by committees of
> technologists from varied backgrounds then establishing whether a person is
> qualified to undertake the tasks that they claim proficiency in would be a
> walk in the park.
>
> For instance, if you came to me and claimed to be a network engineer /
> system admin I would be able to ask you a few pertinent questions that
> would settle the matter very quickly.
>
> If beyond that you wanted to claim that you are advanced/expert/arch
> level, then that would be between you and your prospective employer
> (broadly used to cover contract/consultancy services). You would need to
> provide them with the relevant certifications from the various vendors.
>
> In lieu of this, it will either be up to you to do some social networking
> and get the recommendation of a certified person at that level or even
> better and as happens currently, you will have to be individually
> interviewed by the client’s trusted technologist who would ask you for your
> portfolio and recommendations from other related work. They could further
> protect themselves by withholding your payment until you have delivered on
> their requirements, with the the further option of lodging a complaint
> against you from this body that will be established.
>
> For new concepts that would be cutting edge, then the current principle
> remains valid. Patent your idea then work towards demonstrating its
> usefulness and the proposed applications and a well formed team of
> technologists will give you the support and approval that you need.
>
> There could also be an appeals mechanism within the proposal where the
> entire community could be lobbied for support. A Reddit type of system
> could be used to upvote consensus.
>
> If all fails then take yourself to a jurisdiction/community that gets you
> and let those that put you down burn in the glare of your success.
>
> AS FOR THOSE SAYING THAT THIS WILL STIFLE NEW TECHNOLOGY. HOW DO YOU
> EXPECT SOMEONE TO DEVELOP CUTTING EDGE TECH IF THEY CANNOT EVEN DEMONSTRATE
> BASIC ICT COMPETENCY FROM ANY OF THE MANY FIELDS THAT ALREADY EXIST?!
>
> ​You would never be able to code/develop that new thingamajig if you
> cannot even show the ability to put something reasonable from what exists
> currently. And remember that we are talking about those who do not have any
> currently recognizable documentation to support your proficiency (this is
> my assumption until I can see the final proposed bill).
>
> Regards,
>
> Kevin
>
> On 18 December 2017 at 17:58, Ngigi Waithaka via kictanet <
> kictanet@lists.kictanet.or.ke> wrote:
>
>> My take,
>>
>> Some things are just ridiculous..
>>
>> You have a HR Administrator, A Programmer, Office Administrator, an IP
>> Lawyer, a sweeper, a Cyber Security expert all five working for:
>> a)A banks IT department
>> b) An insurance firms IT department
>> c) A manufacturing firm IT department
>> d) An IT consulting business
>> e)A software engineering firm
>>
>> Give me one set of laws regulating them?
>>
>> You regulate individuals in *professions* not in an industry. Thats why
>> in a bank, the HR Administrator gets regulated by HR association etc,
>> Lawyer gets regulated by ISK, the Programmer (based on whatever courses
>> he’s taken and/or experience etc) by their respective bodies and/or
>> experience etc
>>
>> In an industry, you regulate final products and/or final services
>> delivered!
>>
>> Now, what are some of the professions we have in the software industry?
>> 1. Programmers / developers
>> 2. System Administrators
>> 3. Database Administrators
>> 4. Enterprise Architects
>> 5. UX Designers
>>
>> Now, try making a common regulation for those 5 out of a possible
>> hundreds…
>>
>> Finally, for those us in software, you will agree its more art at some
>> point than science, so how do you regulate art?
>>
>> Do you tell Picasso he can’t paint because he wasn’t certified as an
>> painter? Do you tell Franco he can’t sing because he wasn’t certified as a
>> singer? Do you tell a young Bill Gates he can’t write software because he
>> wasn’t certified in computer science?
>>
>>
>> Regards
>>
>>
>> On Sun, Dec 3, 2017 at 4:57 PM, Watila Alex via kictanet <
>> kictanet@lists.kictanet.or.ke> wrote:
>>
>>> EricKigada: Kenya’s controversial ICT Practitioners Bill 2016 to be tabled in parliament againtechmoran.com/kenyas-controv…https://twitter.com/EricKigada/status/937309893954031616
>>>
>>>
>>> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
>>>
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